Tag Archives: iPhone

Why Can’t People Get Past Form Factor?

By William Kristoph

Apple announced their new phones, the iPhone 5c and the iPhone 5s and there was the typical outrage from many people on the tech blogs. “It’s not new. It’s just color. The 5s fingerprint scanner is a joke.” On and on and on many people talked about how Apple doesn’t innovate because they refused to make the screen bigger on the iPhone.

Really? The screen?

I don’t understand it and I probably never will, but so many techies focus on the size of the iPhone’s screen and the case before they consider it “innovative” and new. It’s just a screen! Whether it’s 4 inches or 4.3 inches or 10, who cares? That’s not what makes the iPhone 5s the first iPhone to make me say, “Wow” since I bought my first iPhone 4 years ago.

The arguably innovative stuff in the iPhone 5s:

  • 64-bit processor
  • M7 co-processor
  • Touch ID (fingerprint reader)
  • The bells and whistles of the new camera

Those four things are far more innovative and important than a bigger screen. Why don’t people notice that? The 64-bit processor is a good way to “future proof” for another two cycles of iPhones at least. The M7 co-processor could be big or useless, but it has the potential to have countless health apps and save battery life. Touch ID is cool, and I’m hopeful that it can be part of two factor authentication. The jury is out on that. Finally, the new camera is a huge selling point. No more blue-only flash, warm tones should look much better and the software that is part of the camera used to be something that only professionals could handle. Now it’s automatic.

Does this make the iPhone better than an Android phone? Maybe, maybe not. That depends on each user and how they like to use a smartphone. But let’s not just the phones based on something as silly as form factor. It’s a silly way to judge a phone and an awful way to discount innovation.

 

 

A Week With Apple TV

Reviewing Apple TV One Week Later

By William Kristoph

It’s been about a week since I picked up an Apple TV. I spent a day or two researching the advantages and disadvantages of it vs. a Roku box. I also chatted up some of my Twitter followers to see what they thought about the differences between to two. After that consideration, I ended up with the Apple TV. There are hundreds of articles out there already, but I thought I’d share my experience too.

Purchasing

I decided to purchase my Apple TV from Best Buy. There wasn’t enough savings buying it from Amazon or directly from Apple to warrant waiting an extra 3-4 days for the Apple TV to arrive. I wanted to be able to use it over the weekend. So I placed an online order at BestBuy.com and chose to have it ready for pickup at the local store. The experience was very good from start to finish. I received proper confirmation from BB that the order was ready for pickup. I was in line less that 5 minutes to complete the pickup of the unit. Apple should be pleased with the experience Best Buy provided for their product in this case.

Unboxing

The box is tiny. In fact, it’s strikingly tiny. The unboxing experience is like any other Apple product. It’s pretty, clean, simple and sort of fun. Pull tabs help get each component out of the box without a tear or crumple. Initial set up is super easy. I plugged in the power cord and plugged in the HDMI cable and the Apple TV sprung to life on my screen.

Set Up

Set up was relatively easy. I had to temporarily turn off some security with my router to allow the Apple TV to complete its initial setup. After getting the hang of the super thin remote, I popped around to the settings so that I could properly set up the Apple TV with my router. I bounced back and forth between the PC and the Apple TV and was satisfied with the settings and locked my router down again. I chose to update the Apple TV to the latest version of the software. I was surprised by how long and sluggish the process seemed. So I moved the Apple TV around to see if my WiFi signal was the issue, but the Apple TV reported a strong signal of 4 bars out of 5.

Continue reading